Glowing Buddhas in technicolor for a brighter afterlife

From the outside, the Ruriden looks like a traditional Buddhist burial building. But once you swipe an electronic IC pass card at the entrance, the tall wooden doors open to reveal a futuristic display of hundreds of multi-colored LED-lit Buddha statues.

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Cafe in Japan serves delicious looking 'salad cakes' made of vegetables

If you’re tired of your plain lettuce and tomato salad, a trip to Vegedeco Cafe will make you rethink the whole concept of salad altogether. Located in the city of Sakae in Nagoya, the cafe serves some amazing looking salad cakes called Vegedeco Salad that are made completely of nutritious whole vegetables — with little or zero sugar, gluten-free, and no fat or batter. The sponge part is made of natural ingredients such as soybean flour.

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Japanese company invents floating bonsai trees

Remember the floating mountains in Avatar? Now you can create your own miniature Avatar-like world with floating bonsai trees. A Japanese company Hoshinchu from Kyushu has invented “Air Bonsai” — an incredible system that makes bonsai magnetically levitate and spin above a small electrified pedestal.

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Abandoned Japanese park with hundreds of stone sculptures of ordinary people

Welcome to Fureai Sekibutsu no Sato. Literally “the village where you can meet stone statues” (ふれあい石像の里)an abandoned park in Osawano, Toyama, is a place where almost three decades ago a very rich man named Mutsuo Furukawa — a chairman of a medical corporation — decided to build an area with hundreds of sculptures in hopes to keep them with him for all eternity. He wanted the park to become a popular tourist place where people could come to relax.

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How a team of 45 people builds luxury hand-made cars in Japan

Unless you are a car enthusiast, you may have never heard of Mitsuoka Motor. It’s a small automaker headquartered in Toyama, known for building uniquely designed cars, some of which take inspiration from British vehicles of the 1950s and 1960s. Two interesting things stand out about this company. One is that they take production cars (from makers like Nissan or Mazda), utilize their engines but replace various aspects of the bodywork to turn it into their own custom-made design. Secondly, they do it all by hand, with a team of 45 skilled craftsmen.

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A World Heritage Site in Kyoto transformed into a sea of colors

In August, there was a light festival in Kyoto that attracted thousands with some truly incredible illuminations. The event took place for two weeks in Tadasu No Mori at the Shimogamo Shrine — a World Heritage Site. According to the organizers, starting this year, the festival will take root as an annual traditional event with the aim of promoting the cultural value of Kyoto. The illumination is the brainchild of the teamLab art group which has become famous for its interactive digital installations.

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Japan's most complicated clock is a 165-year-old mechanical masterpiece

Also known as the Myriad year clock, the Mannen Jimeishou (万年自鳴鐘) was a universal clock designed by the Japanese genius inventor Hisashige Tanaka, who built most of the clock by himself using simple tools like files and saws between the years 1848 and 1851. It is designated as an Important Cultural Asset by the Japanese government.

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Kubo and the Two Strings

Kubo and the Two Strings — critics hail it as a “masterpiece” and “the best animated movie of the summer” — was released in the U.S. last month. Set in mythical Japan, it’s a stop-motion samurai tale, produced by the Oregon-based independent studio Laika (the studio is known for its feature films from a few years ago such as Coraline and ParaNorman). In the flood of computer generated 3D cartoons, it’s captivating to see a movie like this, where the vast majority of elements were made by hand. I can only imagine how much painstaking work was behind the scenes and the result is nothing short of astonishing.

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Incredible photograph of a female samurai from the late 1800s

Female samurai were rare, but they did exist. They were known as onna-bugeisha (女武芸者) and belonged to the Japanese upper class. Trained in the use of weapons, they fought alongside samurai men in times of war to protect their household, family and honor. Some of the famous examples of onna-bugeisha are Empress Jingu, Tomoe Gozen, Nakano Takeko and Hojo Masako.

Via Wikipedia and Niume.

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Japanese farmer uses Google AI to sort cucumbers

Google has an interesting article describing how a cucumber farm in Japan employed Google’s open-source Tensorflow machine learning technology to help with sorting the cucumbers, a difficult and mundane task that usually takes months to learn.

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Museum dedicated to architecture models opens in Tokyo

A museum of architectural models has opened this summer in Tokyo’s Shinagawa ward. It’s called Archi-Depot and it’s Japan’s first and only museum of its kind. The “depot” part of the name makes it sound more like a warehouse than a museum, and that’s exactly what the facility looks like. This makes it quite unique — it doubles as a storage space where architectural companies can pay to rent the shelves and store their building models instead of keeping them in cramped offices, while the guests can enjoy the exhibits.

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Back in the day, the phones were simpler


A little girl having fun pretending to talk on the telephone, Japan, 1958. Photograph by Marc Riboud.

From the photo archive by Astonishing Pictures.

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Stunning view of glowing shrimps trickling down rocks in Japan

Even though this scene looks like it came straight from another planet, what you see here are bioluminescent shrimps flowing like waterfalls down rocks in the Seto Inland Sea in Okayama, Japan.

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Unique tea bags that look like sea creatures

A fishery company Daisho Suisan from Toda City in Saitama has decided to put an end to the classic square-shaped tea bag. With a goal to get younger people more interested in tea, being a fishery company, they came up with an idea to make the tea bags shaped like sea animals.

The idea picked up quickly. Just at the time of this writing, they secured the funds for production via Makuake, a Japanese crowdfunding platform, reaching 2.5 million yen (well over their goal of 500,000 yen).

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'Cinderella Girls' take over the Shinjuku Station underground

This morning, a glorious giant advertisement for The Idolmaster Cinderella Girls mobile game appeared in the underground promenade of the Shinjuku Station. They transformed the entire passageway into one giant ad, everything including the floor, the walls, the pillars and the ceiling. That’s how you do advertising (when you have a seemingly unlimited budget). Have a look.

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